Woodturners of south west florida
Tips               
Please note: Newest tips will be added at the top of this page!
                                                                                                                                                                                                updated 7/20/07
Click here to access other "How To'" step-by-step tutorials

IF YOU HAVE A TIP YOU WOULD LIKE TO SHARE, please contact WSWF Webmaster  with information.
Turning a NATURAL EDGE END GRAIN BOWL - Pictorial Tutorial courtesy of Craft Supplies Darrell Feltmate

Also see this article on the Timeless Woodturnings web site.

 

WHAT MAKES A GOOD FINISH??
Benchmark Finishing article
Finishes for Beginners
Notes on Types of Finishes

SOURCE FOR PLEASING SHAPES FOR WOODTURNED VESSELS
If you are having difficulty coming up with shapes for bowls, look to potters. Books on old pottery will have literally hundreds of ideas for shapes than can be used equally as well with wood. Remeber to keep flowing curves with no flat spots to interrupt the flow of vision..

QUICK SIZING ON SMALL TENONS
When turning a tenon on a chair spindle or any other piece, turn close to the desired size. Then use an open-end wrench as a sizing gauge by pushing it over the wood. The wrench will size the tenon and compress the wood fibers. When glue is applied and the tenon is fit to the mating piece, the glue will cause the compressed fibers to swell making a very tight fit.

HELP MINIMIZE SANDING DUST:
A box fan with a furnace filter taped on the inlet side will help to control sanding dust. Place the fan down stream from the dust source so that the dust is pulled away from you and into the filter. Although this is very effective, you should also wear a dust mask.

CREATING YOUR OWN HOLLOWING SYSTEMS

FACTS on FINISING by Phil Krym - March 2004 WSWF Demosnstration/Presentation

Sanding Disc Storage - new 1/19/04
Stick a wide piece of velcro on the side of your headstock. When sanding at the lathe, just peel off the used disc (if it still has life left in it) and stick it on the velcro on the headstock to await the next piece. It can be wide and long enough to accommodate 6 + discs. This also means when you set up to start sanding, you'll have all the discs out that you'll need on the velcro awaiting their turn.

HOW TO PHOTOGRAPH YOUR WOODTURNINGS                      

AAW Woodturning FUNdamentals

Click on the W-FUN Resources link in the box on the left side of the page. LOTS of excellent info on this web site.

 

Shop Tips for Your Dust Collector Hose
If you have a dust collector with a flexible four-inch diameter hose, here are a couple of tips to make it more useful.

Long-Handled Air Broom
To clean up the shop floor using the hose without having to bend over, take an old shovel handle and attach a couple of Velcro strips to it with screws.  Place the strips about 1.5 and 16 inches from the end of the handle.  Wrap the Velcro strips around the hose so that it extends beyond the end of the handle a couple of inches.  Now you have a long-handled shaving-eating air broom.

Snorkel Extension
If you have hard to get at places that collect lathe debris or sawdust, make a simple extension for your dust collector hose to get into those nooks and crannies.  Cut three circles from ¾ -inch wood stock that are five inches in diameter.  From two of these, cut a 4¼-inch circular hole out of the middle with your band saw (yes, you can cut through the side of the outer circle, it doesn’t matter).  In the last piece, drill a 1-inch diameter hole about ½-inch from the edge; then, leaving a ¾-inch wide rim, remove most of the remainder of the wood to make a large hole that your hand can cover.  (Note: the ¾-inch rim will act as a seat for the end of the dust collector hose.)  Now stack and glue the three pieces together with the unique one on top (Note: if you’ve cut through the outer edge on the discs, locate the cuts so that they are not on top of one another).  After the stack dries, insert a 1-inch diameter piece of PVC pipe (the one I use is 12 inches long) into the one-inch hole. You now have a snorkel extension for your dust collector that easily slips over the end of the 4-inch flexible hose.  You can control (or release) suction through the snorkel by covering or uncovering the large hole in the top disc with your hand.  To make the snorkel even easier to use, I punched small holes about 2½-inches from the end of the dust collector hose on opposite sides so I could tie rubber bands around one of the wire ribs of the hose. I then connected the rubber bands from the opposite sides with a link made from a bent finishing nail.  This combination of rubber bands and metal link lies neatly against the side of the hose when not in use, but can be easily extended over the snorkel to hold it in place while working. 

                                                                                                                                              Bruce Gibson, OVWG   5/01

Quick Accurate Height Adjustment of Cutting Tip When Deep Hollowing with a “D” Handle

I use a “D” handle for deep hollowing.  When working, I often found myself spending needless time trying to guesstimate whether the tip of the cutting tool was above or below center in the work.  Being at centerline, with the cutting tip pointing slightly downwards, is critical for getting a clean cut without “catches”.  Since the height of the tool tip changes as the hollowing progresses, there is a continual need for cutting tip height adjustment.  To make adjustment easier, I’ve simply marked the centerline height on a piece of wood dowel that I stand on the lathe body.  To adjust the cutting tip height, I mark the point where the tool shaft crosses the rest while the tool is in the work.  I then remove the tool from the work (with the lathe off!) and put it back on the rest at the mark, but with the tip outside the work.  I check the height of the tip against the dowel and adjust the tool rest up or down as needed.  I’m now able to resume turning knowing I am working at center height. 

                                                                                                                                              Bruce Gibson, OVWG   5/01

WALL FLOWERS
I was turning a small bowl of a nice wood and ruined it with an errant gouge.  I was so reluctant to discard it that it hung around the scrap barrel until one day, I cut it in half, pitching the torn up part and retaining “half a bowl”.   I carefully cut a back for this using a thin stock, glued it in place and sanded it all even so the back joint line was hardly visible.  I then bored a small hole on back so it could be hung on the wall - there to be filled with dry flowers, potpourri, shells, or
whatever hits your fancy.  Based on the favorable comments, I tool the concept in a slightly different direction.

I took a piece of round stock and bored two holes to accept 4" vials for bud vases.  The holes were each ½ of the radius on the line of the diameter.  I then turned a vase shape to my liking, took it from lathe and cut it in half.  I now had two vase shapes with flat backs suitable for hanging, with a place for a flower bud or two, dry or fresh.

I jokingly refer to these as “wall flowers”, but they offer a nice design challenge and with a selected figured wood, they add an appealing addition to any wall.  My wife has one in which she puts a few dried grasses, and it has brought many favorable comments.

Perhaps there’s nothing new about this, but as I’ve never heard about it or seen it elsewhere, I thought the Guild members might be interested.

                                                                                                                                                         Jim Blough, OVWG
 

 

 

 

TO SPALT YOUR OWN WOOD: 
MIX IN A FOOD PROCESSOR OR BLENDER: 
    ONE CAN BEER 
    ONE & ONE HALF TABLESPOONS AMMONIA 
    ONE CUP MIRACLE GROW (MIXED DOUBLE STRENGTH) 
    OAK LEAVES 
    GRASS CLIPPINGS 
PAINT THIS MIXTURE ON ALL EXPOSED SURFACES OF YOUR GREEN WOOD, AND SEAL
THE WOOD IN A GARBAGE BAG. 
STORE BAGGED WOOD IN A WARM LOCATION. 
CHECK WOOD IN A MONTH OR SO. 
HOW LONG WILL IT TAKE?  YOU BE THE JUDGE! 
P.S. CLEAN THE FOOD PROCESSOR OR BLENDER OUT REALLY WELL WHEN DONE! 
Click here for additional information.

TO MICROWAVE YOUR TURNINGS: 
PLACE YOUR PIECE IN A PLASTIC BAG AND HEAT ON DEFROST FOR FIVE MINUTES. 
REMOVE THE PIECE FROM THE BAG AND LET IT COOL. 
TURN THE BAG INSIDE OUT, AND REPEAT THE MICROWAVE PROCESS.  THIS WAY,
CONDENSATION IS LEFT ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE BAG.  CONTINUE THIS PROCESS UNTIL
NO MORE CONDENSATION APPEARS IN THE BAG. 
THIS WAY, YOU ELIMINATE THE NEED TO WEIGH AND RECORD! 
Click here for additional information.

Wood Color Info
Click here.

Sharpening Gouges
Click here (it will take you to Badger Pond Woodworking Site)

Making Segmented Bowls With Ornamental Inlays
Click here (it will take you to Badger Pond Woodworking Site)

Maintaining Tool Rest Height
When you need to maintain one height setting for your tool rest, but have to change the angle (as often happens when faceplate turning), tighten a small hose clamp around the tool rest shank where it hits the holder. This will prevent gravity from pulling it down as you adjust your angle.

Mixing Epoxy
When you need to mix a small amount of epoxy - put equal amounts of resin and hardener into opposite corners of a plastic sandwich bag.  Twist & mix it until a uniform color appears.  Puncture the bag with a pin, and squeeze out the glue as required with pinpoint precision. No clean-up required - just throw the bag away!

Wood/Dust Toxicity
Click here for detailed toxicity info.

Storing Finishes
Store your frequently used finishes in small plastic shampoo bottles.  Put several small bolts or nuts in the bottle.  Shake to stir up before each use.  A flip of the cap opens or closes.  Easy controlled squirts on the rag applicator and your on your way!

Finishing Pens

Click here.

Pen Turning Instructions
Click here.
Making a Hook Tool
Click here.

Basic Bowl Roughing Out
Click here (it will take you to the Timeless Wood Turnings  Site). Excellent article.

Power Sanding
WHEN POWER SANDING, SLOW DOWN THE LATHE.  RESULTS WILL BE BETTER & SANDING DISKS WILL LAST LONGER.  IF YOU CAN REVERSE THE DIRECTION OF THE LATHE, EVEN BETTER!

Rags
IF YOU USE A RAG TO APPLY & BUFF THE FINISH ON YOUR PIECE WHILE IT IS ROTATING ON THE LATHE - CONSIDER PURCHASING A PACK OF GUN CLEANING PATCHES AT YOU LOCAL K-MART.  TWO DOLLARS FOR TWO HUNDRED VARYING SIZES OF RANDOM SHAPED T-SHIRT MATERIAL.  THESE RARELY CATCH, AND DO NO HARM IF THEY DO.  TOSS OUT WHEN FINISHED!  YOU NEVER HAVE TO LOOK FOR A CLEAN SPOT ON THE RAG.  IF YOU MUST HAVE A LARGER APPLICATOR, USE PAPER TOWELS.  WORKS GREAT! IF IT SNAGS, IT'LL TEAR. FINGERS REMAIN IN THE SOCKETS & WORK STAYS ON THE LATHE!

Grinding Tip
KEEP A LARGE MARKS-A-LOT FELT TIP MARKER BY YOUR GRINDER.  TINT THE SURFACE TO BE GROUND ON YOUR GOUGE OR SCRAPER WITH THE MARKER.  QUICK CHECKS WHILE GRINDING EASILY SHOW WHERE YOU'VE BEEN- OR MORE IMPORTANT, WHERE YOU HAVEN'T BEEN!

Listen to the Experts?
Contrary to what the "experts" say, procedures that you use which are different than someone else's aren't necessarily  "WRONG" - if it works for you, that's fine!

Professionalism
PROFESSIONALISM is not about turning full-time, about sales or the volume of production, or about efficiency -  IT'S ABOUT QUALITY IN THE END PRODUCT!

Be Careful
WHEN A SMALL VOICE INSIDE YOUR HEADS ASKS IF WHAT YOU'RE DOING OR PLANNING MIGHT BE DANGEROUS - STOP AND LISTEN!  IT'S PROBABLY RIGHT!

Clean Your Lathe and Tools with Steel Wool
At least once a week, take steel wool & a very fine sandpaper to your lathe.  Work over the entire toolrest surface and the bedways to remove scratches, dings, glue, and any finish residue.  Wipe it clean, and & WAX the surfaces.  Sure, it's basic! But when was the last time you actually DID it?  While you've got the wax out, wax all your lathe tools also.  SURPRISE!  Everything glides smoothly now!                                                                      submitted by The Silver Fox

Miter Angles for Segmented Rings
From rec.crafts woodturning
A lot of people have asked me for the formula to make segmented rings...I thought I'd share it with everybody.
Just remember the miter angle for:
        8 sides = 22 1/2
        12 sides = 15
        16 sides = 11 1/4
I have posted this chart in alt. binaries.pictures.furniture Let me know if this helps,
Have fun, Dave  dstacy@ix.netcom.com

 
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